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Most of the Media Will Be OK
By Richard Edelman

Culture ,Media
Wall_St_Journal_6AM

Yesterday morning, William Lewis, CEO of Dow Jones and publisher of The Wall Street Journal, had breakfast with the Executive Committee of Edelman. Edelman President and CEO Richard Edelman explores his belief that there is a sustainable business model for mainstream media.

William Lewis, CEO of Dow Jones and publisher of The Wall Street Journal, had breakfast with the Executive Committee of Edelman yesterday morning. Afterward, I walked him to the elevator with a big smile on my face. He believes that there is a sustainable business model for mainstream media. As he said confidently halfway through the meeting, “Most of the media will be ok.” A bit later, he said, “It has never been more important to have a moral purpose in journalism. We provide valuable information to our customers; we aim to be the most accurate news provider in the world.” To all of this I say, three cheers and more, as those of us in public relations need a vibrant media business. Here are highlights of the discussion:

1. From Products to Platforms — Everything at The Wall Street Journal is being re-made for mobile devices. “We are in the constant knowledge business. We provide content as and when the customer needs it, “ Lewis said. “The digital suite of products is now refreshed. We have cut the download time for our content. We are innovating furiously; our Newsmart product is for people who don’t have English as first language.”

2. Social Media Strategy — “Many of our journalists are using social channels to cross-promote their stories. We are also creating our own social networks. For example, our Newsmart community will enable a 25 year old South Korean in technology to connect with a 25 year old Brazilian in the same industry to share experiences.”

3. Be First — Our integrated newsroom aims to be first with notifications to customers, building on our newswires heritage.

4. Advertising Matters — There are many sectors that need to reach the influencers who read the WSJ, from financial services to technology to professional services. Lewis insists on maintaining a strong price point for a full page ad or a home page takeover. Programmatic advertising is becoming substantial and the company now can position the ads across its full product breadth. “We have new products, such as a real estate service called Mansion Global that connects buyers and sellers from the US, China and Spanish speaking nations.”

5. Bespoke Content — This is a possible area for PR firm cooperation with the WSJ. Recently the advertising department developed content on the All-Blacks rugby team from New Zealand for sponsor AIG.

6. Newsroom on Fire — “There is swagger in the newsroom. This produces better journalism. We break the big stories such as the corruption at FIFA. We just won a Pulitzer.”

7. Three Legged Revenue Model — “We have strong revenue in both advertising and circulation. We also make money from information services such as Factiva. We are enabling Factiva to give you the latest information on a senior executive you are calling on for new business.”

8. Dynamic Paywall — “We are thinking about the next generation paywall, more dynamic, harder in places, softer in others.”

Lewis is very much open to PR firms and corporate PR departments coming with ideas to Dow Jones/WSJ. He wants to do more with the conferences such as WSJ Eco or the D Conference. He believes in intelligent sponsored content that enhances the reader experience. He sees the world as a continuum, with two thirds of the WSJ print readers also involved with the digital product via mobile or desktop. Therefore, those of us in the PR business have to adapt, to offer clients our classic service of intelligent relationships with WSJ journalists, but also offer short form video, GIFs, and smart events that enable Show and Tell.

This article originally appeared on Richard Edelman’s 6A.M. Blog.

Written by: Richard Edelman, President and CEO at Edelman

Queen's Speech 2015

Government Affairs
westminster_queens_Speech

The first fully Conservative Queen’s Speech since 1996 contained few surprises – unless you count the fact that Labour MP Dennis Skinner, who by tradition fires off a quip at Her Majesty’s representative Black Rod when he arrives to summon the Commons, was uncharacteristically silent.

The first fully Conservative Queen’s Speech since 1996 contained few surprises – unless you count the fact that Labour MP Dennis Skinner, who by tradition fires off a quip at Her Majesty’s representative Black Rod when he arrives to summon the Commons, was uncharacteristically silent.

David Cameron is watching the Labour leadership contenders fight it out while seeking to enjoy his overall majority for as long as he possibly can – but it won’t be easy. Despite his unexpected outright win at the election, the Prime Minister only has a majority of 12. The honeymoon period will soon be over; the news that the plan to replace the Human Rights Act is running into trouble is proof of that. The political uncertainty of the last few years may be replaced by simply not knowing whether the Government will win key votes week to week, while Mr Cameron tries to keep his MPs’ focus on the European referendum.

To guide you through the implications of the Queen’s Speech, Edelman has created a short briefing which can be found here.

Cinemagraphs: Bringing life to photography

Entertainment ,Media
photography_camera

In the ever-changing world of media, we are constantly innovating and searching for new ways to present information. An effective way to achieve this is sometimes, quite simply, to make it look nice. From Infographics to GIFs, graphical presentation of information is ever more popular.

In the ever-changing world of media, we are constantly innovating and searching for new ways to present information. An effective way to achieve this is sometimes, quite simply, to make it look nice. From Infographics to GIFs, graphical presentation of information is ever more popular.

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words and cinemagraphs are an exciting addition to the digital world. They are a medium in which individual moments of film are blended with a static image, creating a visually stunning and almost hypnotic juxtaposition.

The Digital Artist duo, Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck were among the first to realise their power as a new, more refined method of creating beautiful images

We don’t have to look very far to see the implications that this magic has in the world of communication. There is a huge amount of creative potential for cinemagraphs within content strategy. These unique new ads convince people to stop scrolling and pay attention to the image for longer, allowing the viewer to have more of a lasting impression.

Cinemagraphs: Frederick Haydn-Slater

Written by: Frederick Haydn-Slater, Assistant Account Executive at Edelman

I Like People Like Me

Consumer Trends & Insight ,Media ,Trust
consumer_advocacy

Who would have thought Jess S’s opinion could be so important? Or Tegwen’s. Or even your own. Of course, the rise of ‘person like me’ endorsement (or consumer advocacy, as some would have it) is nothing new. From billboards and brochures right through to Jess S’s epistolary appearance in front of my eyes on a jam-packed M3, ‘people like me’ are ever more numerous.

Who would have thought Jess S’s opinion could be so important? Or Tegwen’s. Or even my own.

Of course, the rise of ‘person like me’ endorsement (or consumer advocacy, as some would have it) is nothing new. Trip Advisor’s entire business proposition is, in many ways, based on exactly that.

Jess S Testimonial

Yet, what continues to strike me is its prevalence. From billboards and brochures right through to Jess S’s epistolary appearance in front of my eyes on a jam-packed M3, ‘people like me’ are ever more numerous. In fact, I’m beginning to wonder whether I can possibly have something in common with that many folk at all.

But I guess that’s the point. When it comes to modern media, we are all equal (providing you don’t count the fact I probably have fewer Twitter followers than you). And that means all opinions are equal too. So if I decide to say something good about a brand, why wouldn’t they use it to decorate their delivery trucks or adorn the testimonials section of their website? I’d certainly expect some kind of reaction if I aired a complaint instead.

Besides, as Edelman’s own Trust Barometer recently showed, nowadays people are far more inclined to trust my views about a company – positive or negative – than those of its CEO, a politician or even the media. And because I have a myriad of ways to publicly express myself, my feelings don’t just matter anymore, they’re highly accessible too.

For brands, that makes monitoring their customers’ views about more than just gathering insights. It’s also an effective and credible way to uncover sound bites that help them showcase the quality of their stuff. To prove that we don’t just have to take their word for it.

Meanwhile, whatever we think about privacy or becoming a vehicle (no pun intended, Jess) for company endorsement, the rest of us have a chance to make our voices heard like never before. To live in a world where our opinion matters just as much as anyone else’s.

Personally, I think that’s pretty cool, so for what it’s worth (note the earlier comment about my Twitter following), I’m going to keep sharing my views and would encourage anyone else to do the same.

Who knows, one day we might find our own words entertaining us in a traffic jam.

Written by: Alex Eeles, Senior Writer at Edelman

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